TIGER summary

The Thailand Inventory Group for Entomological Research (TIGER) project was a collaboration between Kentucky university, the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation (DNP), and Queen Sirikit Botanic Garden (QSBG). The project ran from 2006-2009 collecting insects from twenty four national parks and wildlife sanctuaries around Thailand.

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Twenty-four TIGER collection sites

Twenty-four sampled parks (on the map red indicates parks sampled in year 1; blue: year 2; green: year 3)

  1. 1. Chae Son NP
  2. 2. Doi Chiang Dao WS
  3. 3. Doi Inthanon NP
  4. 4. Doi Phahompok NP
  5. 5. Doi Phu Kha NP
  6. 6. Huai Nam Dung NP
  7. 7. Kaeng Kra Chan NP
  8. 8. Khao Khitchakut NP
  9. 9. Khao Sam Roi Yot NP
  10. 10. Khao Sok NP
  11. 11. Khao Yai NP
  12. 12. Khuean Srinagarindra NP
  13. 13. Mae Wong NP
  14. 14. Nam Nao NP
  15. 15. Namtok Mae Surin NP
  16. 16. Namtok Yong NP
  17. 17. Pa Hin Ngam NP
  18. 18. Pha Taem NP
  19. 19. Phu Kradueng NP
  20. 20. Phu Phan NP
  21. 21. Phu Ruea NP
  22. 22. Pu Toei NP
  23. 23. Tat Tone NP
  24. 24. Thung Salaeng Luang NP

QSBG has processed around 60 000 specimens collected during the project with these specimens being distributed to 115 collaborators around the world for identification to genus and species levels.

Blackfly are a particular nuisance when visiting the summits of mountains such as Doi Inthanon and Doi Pui when they take the opportunity to suck on your, or your pet's, blood. Generally though they are only a major problem in the morning or evening, though this changes with season.

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Species richness for each of the TIGER study sites

A number of new species have been described with holotypes and paratypes being lodged with the QSBG insect collection (see here). A number of these species being named to honour the TIGER project, the scarab beetle Peltonotus tigerus Jameson & Wada 2009 being one example.

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Peltonotus tigerus Jameson & Wada 2009 a species new to science named to honour the TIGER project

To date there have been 55 publications generated dealing with specimens collected through the TIGER project (see here).

A PDF version of this article is available as Bug Bits #2